Floral printed fabrics have come a long way since the ’80s when Mario Buatta was crowned the Prince of Chintz. His beautifully designed rooms were filled with glorious traditional florals. A favorite for Mario was Lee Jofa’s Althea.
Times have changed, more isn’t necessarily more. The designs for floral fabrics are more streamlined. Patterns are layered less, a single floral pattern can be the focal point of a room’s design. Osborne & Little’s  pattern Japonerie is one of the new florals.  It has cleaner lines, a larger scale and a bolder pattern. A Mod Floral.

Another of the new, bold, mod florals is Butterfly Garden also from Osborne & Little. A vibrant mix of colorful butterflies and black and white and flowers.

 

Butterfly Garden

Designers Guild has created the Kaori Collection. The Japanese aesthetic gives this collection the style of the new mod floral.

Mokuren from the Kaori Collection.

Designer Guild’s Sashiko pattern has a fresh modern style.

 

Montsuki is a pattern of embroidered tulips. The simplicity and detail of the design creates a modern take on the traditional tulip motif.

Sashiki also from Designers Guild is a pattern of embroidered chrysanthemums. Beautiful.

Alexandria in lapis from DesignersGuild is bursting with energy.

 

Lee Jofa hasn’t stayed with just traditional florals. The Zinnia pattern from the Homes & Gardens Collection by Baker Lifestyle is a bright, exuberant example of the mod floral.

                                                                                      On this side of the pond we have Thibaut, who has designed collections full of the new mod floral. The Monterey is one of those collections.

Thibaut’s  Nassau pattern is a bright, beautiful updated floral.
The Mod Florals add a wonderful design element that can be used in traditional, transitional or modern designs.